History Quiz / Myths of Women's History

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Can you name the Myths of Women's History?

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No early feminist demonstration burned these.Possibly conflation of media images of feminists tossing constricting clothing into garbage cans with draft-resistors burning their draft cards.
There is no early reference showing English common law allowed a husband to beat his wife with a stick no bigger than this (giving rise to the phrase, rule of _____):Earliest citation is 1881 book by Harriet H. Robinson, but interpretations vary as to whether she was claiming it was part of English common law. 1868 State v. Rhodes - NC Supreme Court referenced the rule, but said that there was no RIGHT to beat one's wife, merely that they would not interfere in the domestic practice.
There was no female pope by this name. She was supposedly outed when she gave birth, and an angry mob stoned her.Earliest reference was 200 years after supposed fact, and given as a lesson to how women should know their place, and later as an anti-Catholic propaganda. Further there are no gaps in papal succession which would allow for such a pope.
This wife of Leofric, the Anglo-Saxon earl of Mercia did not ride nude through through the town of Coventry opposing heavy taxation on her husband's subjects.The oldest telling is by Roger of Wendover in the Flores Historiarum, 200 years after its supposed occurrence. Coventry, recently founded would have been too small for such an act to have had profound consequences. The peeping Tom part of the story rises even later.
Though this woman was a seamstress and flag maker, did not make the first American Flag.The story was not told until 1870 by her grandson, and then even he claimed it was a story that needed confirmation. She was, however, as records show, paid in 1777 by the Pennsylvania State Navy Board for making 'ship's colours, &c.'
While it is possible this Native American girl saved Captain John Smith, it is more likely a story Smith embellished in order to promote himself and the colony.Smith only added the details about being saved by her after she had become famous. The letter he had claimed to have written to Queen Anne detailing the events, has never been found.
Contrary to assertions that she was black, and other assertions that she was NOT black, the race of this Egyptian ruler is not known.She was descended from the Greek Macedonian Ptolemy Soter, and many of their marriages were incestuous. Thus her ancestry is at least 25-50% non-African. While the rest of her ancestry is unknown, the Ptolemys were xenophobic. She was the first ruler to speak Egyptian, though this does not necessarily mean she was of black African ancestry.
Though opposed to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Rep. Howard Smith, (D-VA) did not include this word, extending protection to females, into the bill to make its defeat more likely.He had long favored woman's rights, stated that if the bill he opposed were to pass he wanted to bring some good out of it, and stated that he feared that without its inclusion, black women would be able to find protection that white women would not have. Nor was it a joke. The oft cited laughter that occurred during the introduction of the amendment was likely in directed to a letter that was read calling for the right of an unmarried woman to find a husband.
Though there may be legitimate reasons to criticize the American's trip to North Vietnam, she was not directly involved in the death or beating of American POW's.Though there is much to criticize about her actions, the story of a pilot being brutally beaten for spitting on her and the story that she turned over messages she had received from POWs have been shown to be false.
This former First Lady did not defend Black Panthers Warren Akimbo, Bobby Seale and Ericka Huggins.While at Yale she did work as an intern for an attorney who also defended Black Panthers. When Bobby Seale and Ericka Huggins were on trial near Yale, there were student demonstrations in support of them getting a fair trial. She presided over a meeting of law students who were deciding how to respond to the demonstrations, the trial, and police gassing of demonstrators. No evidence exists that she led the demonstration.

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