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D-MONEY 2015 REPRESENT

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HintAnswer
Long Breve
Ends on D, ambitus less than an octave
Prayer that follows the Alleluia, just before the Gospel reading of the day, especially on important feast days
A single symbol in square notation. One of these normally contains from one to four notes but only ever one syllable.
Prayers that change from day to day
A musician at the cathedral church of Notre-Dame in the later thirteenth century who composed three-part organa and four-part quadrupla. Compiled the Magnus Liber.
Text containing additional songs, in verse, sung in honor of specific occasions or people
A style in which each syllable generally has more than one neume
Text containing music for Vespers
Ways of categorizing different scales, into which the repertory of 'Gregorian' chant was classified, from about the eighth or ninth century.
A liturgical prayer, often set to music, framing a whole psalm, or sections of a psalm, or sometimes just a verse from a psalm
Part of mass following the Sanctus when the parish proclaims 'Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord'
Text containing the 'Hours' of the Office, which are prayers said by priests/monks throughout the day
Early morning prayer, said at midnight
Part of mass alternating reading from the Bible and singing responsorial psalms
The practice of alternating solo intonations and choral responses in psalmodic texts
A style in which each syllable generally has one neume (even a multi-note neume)
A smaller note head, after the main pitch, sung lighter.
A daily cycle of prayers to be said by priests and monks at various times of the day, based on antiphons that serve to introduce psalms.
Long Breve Breve
Ends on E, ambitus an octave or more
A counterpoint written below the Tenor
Note symbols used to notate a descending scale, developed out of their practicality of notation with a quill pen.
A subsection of a chant, antiphon, or psalm. Often sung by soloists
A musician at the cathedral church of Notre-Dame who wrote two-part organa. Thirteenth century.
Part of mass containing the text 'Glory to God in the highest'
A single pitch, usually higher than the preceding one, with a tail descending on the right.
A neume containing a single pitch, notated as a black square.
A piece of music setting a non-liturgical text, often not in Latin.
Contrapuntal voice often in the same range as the tenor
A technique popular in teh late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries, using rapid alternation of notes, back and forth, between two voices, one on the beat, the other syncopat
HintAnswer
The second voice above the tenor
Part of mass when the bread and wine are placed on the altar
A motet with sets of texts in multiple languages (with one being in Latin)
Prayers just before bed when the day is complete, said around 9PM
Part of mass containing the text 'Lord have mercy'
devotional chant, not associated with either the Mass or the Office but specifically dedicated to a particular intention, or a particular saint
Morning prayer meaning 'Third', said at 9AM
CDE-FGA
Part of mass proclaiming the Gospel during Lenten season
Collection of prayers for different hours of the day, but not as complete as the Breviary. Designed for private worship of wealthy individuals who were not priests or monks.
Afternoon prayer meaning 'Ninth', said at 3PM
Ends on G, ambitus less than an octave
music that is sung by alternating back and forth between two singers or two groups of singers
Short text ('little verse'), followed by an answer or 'response'; the solo part of the responsorial psalmody
The middle pitch in a group of three ascending conjunct pitches, written with jagged edges on the top and bottom. It was probably sung lightly, perhaps with a slight tremolo.
Part of mass when the priest says, 'Go forth, the mass is ended'
A textual interpolation in a prayer with its own music
Part of mass when the parish consumes of the transubstantiated body of Christ
The celebration of the rituals of Christianity
Ends on G, ambitus an octave or more
GAB-CDE
Ends on D, ambitus an octave or more
A piece of three-part polyphony, with the tenor singing the liturgical plainsong in slow notes, and two upper voices singing much more elaborate music (mainly by Perotinus)
Text containing music for antiphons for a whole liturgical year
An early composer who wrote the Micrologus, invented solmization, and created the Guidonian Hand.
Part of an organum setting where the Tenor no longer moves in very slow notes, but moves faster in teh same rhythm as the other parts.
Ends on E, ambitus less than an octave
A song of King David from the Old Testament, shared by Jews and Christians
Latin term for range, in reference to modes
Nighttime prayer meaning 'Praise', said at 3AM
Long Long
HintAnswer
Ends on F, ambitus an octave or more
FGA-BbCD
Part of mass when the parish proclaims 'Holy, holy, holy Lord. God of power and might.'
Ends on F, ambitus less than an octave
Evening prayers, said at 6PM
Moving from one hexachord to another when singing music that goes beyond the interval of a major sixth
Text containing the Psalms of David
The notational system of so-called 'Gregorian' chant, developed over many centuries. It came into focus in the twelfth century, wiht a four-line staff and neumes.
There are two of these in the Medieval and Renaissance periods. They indicate the position of the half step (semitone) in the hexachord.
Etymologically meaning 'bound together', this notation binds two pitches into one neume. Contains more than one note but never more than one syllable.
Catholic public celebration of the Eucharist, led by a priest
A modern compilation (of over 2000 pages) containing most of the music in plainchant that is needed for choirs to sing the right music at Mass and the Offices
A piece of four-part polyphony, wiht the tenor singing the liturgical plainsong in slow notes, and three upper voices singing much more elaborate music (mainly by Perotinus)
Several notes sung on one syllable
A motet in which the two upper voices change around when a phrase is repeated.
A style in which each syllable generally has one note
The process of giving the correct hexachordal names to notes
A prayer depending on a response, of which a part is repeated
Breve Long
The 'Great Book of Organa' comprising the complete two-part organa of Leoninus, but also the additions by Perotinus, including the tripla and quadrupla, made in the late 13th cent.
Part of mass when the parish proclaims 'Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world. Have mercy on us. (x2) Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world. Grant us peace.'
The voice in polyphony that holds the plainsong
The third voice above the tenor, also referred to as the treble
The scale of six notes, around a central half step (semitone)
Part of mass proclaiming the Gospel during non Lenten season
a piece of two-part polyphony with the tenor singing the liturgical plainsong in slow notes, and the upper voice singing much more elaborate music. (Mainly composed by Leoninus)
Introductory part of mass
Noon prayer meaning 'Sixth'
A motet with two texts.
Morning prayer meaning 'First', said at 6AM
Text containing the music for mass, needed by the priest for a complete year

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