Death and Shakespeare

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Can you name the Shakespeare plays that feature each quote about death?

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Noblest of men, woo’t die? Hast thou no care of me? Shall I abide in this dull world, which in thy absence is no better than a sty?
That we shall die, we know; 'tis but the time and drawing days out, that men stand upon.
Imperious Caesar, dead and turned to clay, might stop a hole to keep the wind away.
The wariest and most loathed worldly life that age, ache, penury and imprisonment can lay on nature, is a paradise to what we fear of death.
Out alas. She’s cold, her blood is settled and her joints are stiff...Death lies on her like an untimely frost upon the sweetest flower of all the field.
As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods, they kill us for their sport.
Last scene of all, that ends this strange eventful history, is second childishness and mere oblivion, sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
After life’s fitful fever he sleeps well; treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison, malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing can touch him further!
Cry woe, destruction, ruin and decay. The worst is death, and Death will have his day.
Lord, Lord, methought, what pain it was to drown, what dreadful noise of waters in mine ears, what ugly sights of death within mine eyes!
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, it seems to me most strange that men should fear, seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come.
But thoughts, the slaves of life, and life, time’s fool, and time, that takes survey of all the world, must have a stop.
I am dying, Egypt, dying. Only I here importune death awhile until of many thousand kisses the poor last I lay upon thy lips.
Come, be a man! Drown thyself? Drown cats and blind puppies.
Howl, howl, howl, howl! O, you are men of stones!...She’s gone for ever. I know when one is dead and when one lives--she's dead as earth.
Out, sword, and wound the pap of Pyramus; ay, that left pap, where heart doth hop. Thus die I, thus, thus, thus.
Reason thus with life: if I do lose thee, I do lose a thing that none but fools would keep.
I’ll go see if the bear be gone from the gentleman, and how much he hath eaten…if there be any of him left, I’ll bury it.
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come when we have shuffled off this mortal coil must give us pause: there’s the respect that makes calamity of so long life.
Men must endure their going hence even as their coming hither. Ripeness is all.

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Created Nov 21, 2010Editor's PickReportNominate
Tags:play, quote, Shakespeare, death, stage, theatre, tragedy