Language Quizzes

For many, trying to learn a new language can be a difficult thing to do. If you can't roll your 'R's or you find verb conjugation a nightmare, don't give up, because Sporcle language games can help you stay on top of your language skills. Whether you need some Italian games or if you need another studying method for your Spanish test, you can try one of the language quizzes, pronto! If foreign language games and quizzes aren't what you're looking for, try one of our Word Ladder games. If you want a real challenge, try testing your vocabulary with a challenging language game or get your tongue twisting with a Latin language quiz. With a variety of language games and quizzes, you should find something to talk about (in whatever language you choose).

Today's Featured Game

Rhymes with 'Cake'
This should be as easy as pie... or cake.
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From the Sporcle Archives:
Japanese Katakana

More Recent Games

Rhymes with Heart
-Editor Pick-
A heartless quiz, but rhymes will do.
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-ANG Word Blitz
Dang, this quiz is trickier than we thought!
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Word Vetting
-Editor Pick-
There's a cat in the decathlon!
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4-Letter Clickagrams
Four little letters. They go together like two, two-letter pairs.
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▒ Word Soladderquy ▒
-Editor Pick-
To play, or not to play ...
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Same Thing - Different Word
As long as these words don't mean the opposite definition as well. We're looking at you 'literally'.
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S-P-O-R-C-L-E Wheel of Fortune
-Editor Pick-
It's nearly as good as Sporcle
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Vocabulary Blitz IV
Nothing like a vocabulary blitz to get your blood pumping.
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European National Anthems by translated first line
-Editor Pick-
No need to sit down for this one.
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1-10 Letter W Words
We're waiting while words wander wholesomely.
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Italian: “The Godfather” Style
-Editor Pick-
It's a Sicilian message. It means Luca Brasi sleeps with the fishes.
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US to UK Spellings
People in the UK must really like their vowels.
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How Many Ways Can I Say I'm Sorry?
-Editor Pick-
Sporcle's hardest word to say.
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Starts With VAN
You're so VAN, you probably think this quiz is about you.
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Words Missing Words: C
-Editor Pick-
Hope this doesn't make you 'C' sick.
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Click the Cracy!
-Editor Pick-
This quiz will drive you Crasy!
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Add a Letter, Build a Word!
We get a strange feeling of satisfaction knowing that we built something.
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Most Common Words in a Thesaurus
-Editor Pick-
Get ready for this Query, Exam, Examination, Investigation, Test ...
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Romans Go Home
-Editor Pick-
Now write it down a hundred times.
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What Did You Call My Book?
Some of these books sound so much cooler in their original languages.
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Vocabulary Blitz 57
-Editor Pick-
57 Varieties (Well five actually)
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3-Letter Vocabulary
3 letters can sure pack a punch.
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Two minutes of -ell
-Editor Pick-
-ell hath no fury like a Sporcle quiz scorned.
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Homonym Slideshow II
-Editor Pick-
Sounds easy!
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Starts with 'Th'
Sh! It's time for Th to have the spotlight.
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Ec-chhh! Another 'Begins With' Quiz! (EC)
-Editor Pick-
Ecky-Thump
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'R' Vocabulary
These words are the real deal.
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'Sorting tHat' Blitz: -LY Words
-Editor Pick-
Slowly, slowly catchy adverbs.
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Drop an S
S is probably the most slippery letter we've ever seen.
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Add a Letter, Make it Better
If we got paid by the letter, we'd just make quizzes like this all the time.
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Language Editor: Flick

Recent popular comments in Language

  1. Words That Describe Themselves
    102
    Awesome quiz, but the word "short" is a little subjective.
  2. Words That Describe Themselves
    81
    Because if the word were not Americanized it would be spelled Americanised.
  3. US to UK Spellings
    78
    Many words and spellings that we assume are Americanisms are actually old English. When the Pilgrims sailed the seas, for example, the past participle of 'got' in the UK was 'gotten'. The '-ten' disappeared over the years in the UK, and we now have Americans using the older version, 'gotten', and the British using the bastardised version, 'got'. But people assume that it was the Americans who changed the language. Languages always change and evolve, it's one of the things that makes them so much fun - they're alive. My only (minor) quibble with this quiz was seeing curb and draft, both of which are perfectly-spelled UK-English words. We just use alternate spellings to convey alternate meanings for the semi-homonyms.
  4. US to UK Spellings
    60
    I think it would be helpful to put (beer) in parentheses next to draft.
  5. Words That Describe Themselves
    55
    Personally, I find the word pulchritudinous to be very pulchritudinous... Beauty is in the eye of the beholder...
  6. Drop an S
    54
    Diaster. Who knew? Good game!
  7. Words That Describe Themselves
    54
    Who says you can't verb the noun 'verb?'
  8. US to UK Spellings
    53
    @buddhahocking: I will concede that the UK spellings are the original in most cases, as I think most people know or assume. But you chose a poor example. Aluminum was the original word chosen by the man who discovered it. The spelling and pronunciation were only changed later to conform with other elements.
  9. US Regional Lingo
    50
    For the hair one everybody I've ever known (mostly from Ohio and North Carolina) call them either pony tail holders or just hair bands. Neither of those are on the list...
  10. US Regional Lingo
    49
    I couldn't figure out what you were asking for in the hair one. I call them ponytail holders...or if they are fabric-y, then a scrunchie. I tried hairbow, clip, and everything I could think of except elastic! Also, I call the cart a "buggy" and couldn't come up with the top answer of "shopping cart" (did get the grocery cart though, haha!) Also, I thought "Hero" could also be spelled "gyro" but you didn't take that. I'm surprised that "soft drink" didn't have a higher percentage, because if you don't call it by a brand name, that's what people I know would say. I also think you need "attic sale" as an option for the yard sale one.